Essay for a summer writing class:

https://wac.colostate.edu/docs/books/mindful/chapter9.pdf

Read the first article by Sarah Davis titled “The Blurred Lines Effect” in the first link

Attached is the second text

The last link is the last source

HERE IS THE PROMPT: Create a thesis that argues any ideas taken from this article using the three sources provided…

You will need to put at least two other texts in conversation with Davis’ ideas—you should locate one credible source on your own, and may use ideas from the Ullman and/or Adichie videos (Links) and/or the Valenti text (Class Files), as well.

Make a clearly worded, debatable claim about an idea in Davis. Your essay body paragraphs should support and analyze your claim with the goal of convincing your audience to adopt, or at least understand, your perspective. Your support, framed by your ideas in your own words, should consist of paraphrases and/or brief idea quotations from the course texts, and from at least one other credible resource you locate. After each source use, unpack the ideas and follow this with your own explanation and analysis. (Consult the Critical Thinking document for advice on analyzing ideas). In the academic world, nothing is all-or-nothing, black-and-white, all good-or-all bad, so do not flatten (oversimplify) the ideas you write about.

Reminder: Avoid presenting source ideas in a string of paragraphs that begin something like this: “Davis claims…” “She also explains…” “Another idea in Davis’s piece…” “The other writer adds that…”

Tone and Audience: After initial brainstorming/listing/organizing of ideas, present your drafts in academic tone. Your drafts should be long enough to be specific and analytical, but not so long that they are fluffy, flabby, or redundant. At least your last draft should follow the advice you studied in Williams’s chapter “Concision.” Your audience consists of educated people who are aware the general subject but are unfamiliar with your source texts.

Attachments

Valenti Article.docx

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