Statement of the Problem
A. Briefly discuss the public health problem, including epidemiological patterns, trends, and populations affected. Is this a population or individual
health problem?
B. Analyze the social determinants of health- and social justice-related disparities that impact the distribution of this problem in a community or
target population.
C. Briefly discuss your program proposal’s objectives and its logic model for planning. Would your program proposal focus on prevention or
treatment?
D. Conduct an assessment of a need in your community, ensuring the inclusion of a description of the community and how this proposed program
may improve the health, safety, and quality of life for people in their communities. Be sure to specify the ecological framework for health
problems within the community. Note that you will not conduct a full community needs assessment; rather, you will identify a need through a
preliminary review of local newspapers or other relevant sources. Your instructor is available to review sources and identify ways to obtain
information and navigate the system. From there, you will research what is out there, what is missing, what others have done to solve the
problem, and so on. This evaluation presents an opportunity for you to engage the community by contacting appropriate individuals either
directly or using the internet or telephone to interview them about the problem selected.
E. Based on your program proposal’s objectives and your assessment of the need in the community, evaluate project methods such as
study/intervention design and statistical issues related to sampling, measurement, and analysis for their strengths and weaknesses in addressing
the public health problem you have identified.

II. Literature Review
Using secondary sources, analyze how the health problem is being addressed in other communities. How prevalent is it? Through a review of the
literature, evaluate the social, political, and historical milestones and trends relative to the identified problem. You should also review interventions that
have been attempted in other communities and their success, or lack thereof.
A. Provide evidence by reviewing the scientific literature related to public health problem, information on the needs of the community, potential
interventions or programs, and appropriate and relevant theoretical framework(s).
B. Analyze the human subjects-related concerns and protections that will be established in the proposal. In other words, what issues must be
considered with regard to human participation research, and how will those issues be not only addressed, but protected (e.g., Institutional
Review Board approval) throughout the proposal?

III. Recommendations
Based on the statement of the problem, a thorough review of the literature, and the identification of potential program/intervention model(s) and
theoretical framework(s) related to the health problem, provide recommendations for addressing the issue through appropriate public health strategies
(including public policy, community mobilization, patient or provider education, and health communications).
A. Based on your research and identified community need, concisely suggest (one paragraph at the most) appropriate technical and professional
communication strategies that will promote your public health program.
B. Propose evaluation methods for determining efficacy of the program. According to the CDC, program evaluation questions generally fall into
several groups. How will you evaluate your program based on this framework? For example, would you use the implementation, effectiveness,
efficiency, or cost-effectiveness method of evaluation?
C. How will you attend to attribution (i.e., can progress on goals and objectives be shown to relate to your program, as opposed to other things that
are going on at the same time) in your program?

IV. Conclusion
A. Articulate any limitations of the proposal.
B. Summarize how the rights, interests, and freedom of individuals and community interests may be impacted by the program proposal.
C. Discuss implications for future research or related projects or programs.

Leave a Reply